Tuesday, 16 July 2013

July Foliage Follow-up

It's the July Foliage Follow-up! I can hardly believe we are talking July. This is my month. The single best month of the year. I couldn't be more excited! This follow-up is a mixed bag of goodness.

This is one of my favourite spots in the garden. It's hot hot hot and thankfully all the yuccas love it! And the nearby succulent "ish" planter (ish deriving from the presence of cordyline and kangaroo paws) is loving the heat too!


And now for some real foliage excitement. A new to me palm! I have been searching and searching for a nice sabal minor with no success. But thanks to Charlie from the Pacific Northwest Palm Society I finally have a beautiful one for the garden. Now where to plant it?

 Dicksonia Antarctica enjoying the morning sunshine...


 With all the sunshine we have been having my chamaerops humilis has been exploding with new growth. I absolutely love this palm!

Bananas are not only massive but also cast one of the coolest shadows during the morning hours.


It's a palmy affair...

And it wouldn't be the foliage follow-up without some good pokes... The agaves are certainly happy.


This next one is really special ... Cyathea Australis! This was the kindest gift. It has been grown from spores of tree ferns in a particularly cold region of Tasmania!

Apparently these are rare in cultivation and that most labelled cyathea australis are in fact cyathea cooperi. I have it in the most sheltered spot of the yard and will be giving it some protection to see it through the winters.

A view I don't usually share is of the larger trees in the yard. When I saw large I really mean monster sized.

 And last but not least, olea leccino! This is one happy tree to see in the summer evening. It glows!

For more of the foliage follow-up head on over to Pam's blog digging

14 comments:

  1. Happy July Louis! Your palms and bananas are huge and beautiful! Your garden looks very happy with the sun! I love that you have some conifers in your garden as well as they are so beautiful with the sun streaming through their needles, have a nice fragrance, sound beautiful with the wind blowing through them, and remind us of how lucky we are to live in a place where we can grow both them and things like bananas, palms, and agaves!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, outlaw! The bananas are the biggest they have ever been for me. I'm loving it! Everything has certainly loved this sunshine we've been having. You're right about variety, we are certainly blessed

      Delete
  2. It's so unfair that July only comes once a year. Too bad we can't live in a world like the movie Groundhog Day, where we have to repeat the month of July over and over.

    Love that banana shadow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like you're thinking. I could live july over and over again quite happily!

      Delete
  3. I have to say your palms and other desert and tropical plants look great and, factoring in that they're growing in Canada, I'm blown away. Do you need to take precautions to protect them when winter comes?

    I'm glad Mother Nature is treating you well this July. Enjoy the sun and the warm weather!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! There are not much efforts in place for winter care. Pretty much all I do is take out any non hardy succulents, I build a wire cage around the banana stalks and fill it with leaves, and then beyond that have burlap on hand for the tree ferns, chamaerops and pindo palm. Another trick that I've employed during really cold winters is to get the old fashioned christmas lights because they give off a bit of heat. But thats about it. It only adds up to a couple hours work over the winter months and is well worth it.

      I am soo glad how things have been this July! It is definitely one to enjoy!

      Delete
  4. I would never have guessed your garden is in Canada. It looks a lot like my front yard here in Houston. Great combos and agave collection.
    David/:0)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, David. That is a major compliment seeing as I love Texas gardens with their big agaves!

      Delete
  5. Hey, your new palm is a Texas native! I have 3 Sabal minors in my front garden and love them. They are slow to establish but seem to be growing well now. Your bowl planter in the same picture is gorgeous too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pam. I love Sabal Minor! I'm super excited. I hear they are painfully slow. But luckily I got one big enough to enjoy right away :)

      Delete
  6. Replies
    1. Thank you very much! And thanks for stopping by to comment. :)

      Delete
  7. Congrats on the new palm!!! Tell us more about the succulent "ish" planter, the planter itself actually...I love it! Metal? Wood? Ceramic?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!! The new palm is somewhat of a dream. I love it! It was delivered to the house while I was at work the other day. And they were so excited about the palms in the yard (particularly the chamaerops) that I might be featured in Hardy Palm International.

      The pot is a favourite of mine. And I don't know if I should let out my secret ... It's plastic! It looks too nice and kind of posh, but it was super cheap.

      Delete